Why Google Needs to ‘Do an Apple With Motorola’ to Make Play a Success

2012 has been a fantastic year for smartphones, with penetration pushing past the 50% mark in key markets such as the UK and US (some estimates even put US penetration as high as 70%).  Apple’s iPhone is the leading smartphone in most key markets but Google’s Android Operating System (OS) has much larger market share: c. 70% compared to c. 20% for iOS (Gartner estimated global market shares to be 64% and 19% respectively back in Q2 2012).  But these market share statistics can be misleading, particularly when it comes to understanding the digital content and services marketplaces.

Android Fragmentation Complicates Content Strategy

The fragmented nature of the Android landscape is well documented but close analysis of key metrics reveals some startling trends with significant implications for content providers (see figure):

Of course there are many mitigating factors, but that simply does not matter from a consumer perspective nor indeed from a content owner’s perspective.  Both iOS and Android have got vast App catalogues (750k and 650k respectively) and both have vast numbers of apps downloaded (35 billion and 25 billion respectively).  Both also have huge installed bases of devices: 450 million iOS devices and 600 million Android devices.  But there is only one clear leader in paid content: Apple.

Looking just at music sales, Apple’s music annual music sales (based on the last reported 12 months) equate to approximately $4.00 per iOS device, compared to just 50 cents per Android device.  Apple wins in part because of its longer presence in market, but more importantly because it exercises complete control of the user journey in a closed ecosystem.

 

The Importance of Closed Ecosystems

The success stories of paid content to date are closed ecosystems: iTunes / iOS, Playstation, xBox, Kindle.  Though the controlled nature of these ecosystems may limit user freedom, they guarantee a quality of user experience.  In these post-scarcity days of content, the quality of experience becomes a scarce experience which people are willing to pay for.  Google simply cannot exercise that degree of control because of its pursuit of a less-closed (but not wholly open) ecosystem strategy.  It depends upon device manufacturers to determine the user experience and also gives other value chain members much more control, such as allowing operators (Vodafone) and retailers (Amazon) to open their own Android stores, as well as, of course handset manufacturers (Sony).

Smartphones with Dumb Users

In a pure mobile handset analysis this doesn’t matter too much.  But from a content strategy perspective it matters massively so.    The problem is compounded by the fact that that as smartphones go mainstream the user base sophistication dilutes.   With so many consumers increasingly buying smartphones because they are cheap and on a good tariff, rather than for their smartphone functionality we are ending up with a scenario of smartphones with dumb users.  (I am indebted to my former Jupiter colleague Ian Foggfor this phrase). This factor arguably affects Android devices more than it does Apple devices because a) they are more mainstream b) they are often cheaper.  This matters for content owners because the more engaged, more tech savvy smartphone owners are also the ones most likely to pay for content.

Google Needs to ‘Do An Apple’ and Not ‘A Microsoft’

With growth slowing in the digital music space, it is clear that new momentum is needed.  Google is potentially the strongest opportunity to bring mass market traction to the digital music space, but currently its music strategy, and paid content strategy in general, is falling short due to all of the reasons outlined above.

Google does however have an incredibly strong set of assets at its disposal, in terms of installed based and growing adoption.  If Google is serious about making its Play strategy a success then it needs to start putting itself first.  Back in the early 2000’s Microsoft expected to be the dominant force in digital music because Windows Media Player was the #1 music player and Windows DRM was the industry standard rights protection.  But instead of pushing ahead with a bold Microsoft music offering it relied upon its hardware and services partners to do it for them.  Just as Google now is sensitive to the concerns of its commercial partners, so Microsoft was then.  Of course Microsoft lost the battle and their softly-softly approach was powerless to fight off the rapid onslaught of iTunes.   Microsoft eventually realized that it needed to go it alone, launching Zune, but it was too little, too late.  Interestingly there wasn’t much a backlash from commercial partners when it did so. Launching a standalone music strategy was actually compatible with being a platform partner.

Now Google has an opportunity to learn from both Microsoft’s mistakes and Apple’s success by turning its recently acquired asset Motorola into a closed Play ecosystem to rival iTunes.  This doesn’t preclude Android partners from continuing to build their own devices and app stores, but it does create a paid content beachhead for Google, from which it can build a base of highly engaged digital consumers who will quickly learn to value the benefits of a high quality, unified content and device experience.  In a Motorola ecosystem Google can truly allow Google+ and Play to become the glue that binds together its diverse set of valuable assets.  Without it though, Play will continue to struggle for relevance in a fragmented and confusing Android user journey.

 

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The Media Format Bill Of Rights: A Manifesto for the Next Generation of Media Products

Today I have published the first Media Industry Blog report:

The Media Format Bill Of Rights: A Manifesto for the Next Generation of Media Products

The report is available free of charge to subscribers of Media Industry Blog (to subscribe simply submit your email address in the form on the top right of this page).

The Media Format Bill of Rights builds upon a series of concepts and frameworks first discussed in the report ‘The Music Format Bill of Rights’ (which can be downloaded here).  Although some principles translate cleanly across other media industries many others have a more complex story.  This report looks at just how diverse the challenges are, and makes the case for a media product innovation framework across multiple media industries.  Here are a few highlights.

The Future of Paid Content Is At Stake

With the notable exception of games, media industries have failed to translate the digitization of consumer media consumption into digitization of their revenues. Digital revenue shares will continue to either remain stuck in single digit percentages or help pull down total revenues for as long as the digital products they depend upon fail to fully embrace the capabilities of digital interactivity. Digital content products need dramatically reinventing for the digital age, to be built around four fundamental and inalienable principles of being Dynamic, Interactive, Social and Curated (D.I.S.C.).

This is the case for nothing less than an entirely new generation of media formats and products. Products that will be radically different from their predecessors and that will crucially be title-specific, not store or service specific. Rights owners will have to overcome some major licensing and commercial issues, but the stakes are high enough to warrant the effort. At risk is the entire future of paid content.

The Consumption Era Has Yet To Be Monetized

Ever since consumers started downloading from Napster and ripping DVDs and CDs the balance of power across all media industries shifted from media company to audience. The digitization of content consumption is firmly established, yet the same cannot be said of media business revenues.  Digitization is transforming consumers’ relationships with content and threatens 20th century media business practices with obsolescence and irrelevance. And yet, even though the PC and connected devices are stealing ever larger shares of media consumption, only the Games and Music industries have managed to convert more than 5% of their total revenues to digital products. And for the music industry it is hardly a success story, with overall revenues declining more quickly than digital can make up for. Underlying the cross-industry inability to successfully monetize the consumption era is a recurring theme: the lack of new products and formats tailor made for the digital age. The Games Industry got it right (witness the continued growth from mobile and social gaming, and the ability of consoles to flourish even as the retail channel perishes) but other media industries have yet to get there.  Three core factors underpin these challenges:

  • Content scarcity is gone
  • Concepts of ownership are fluid
  • Consumers consume more yet pay less

Piracy is Both Cause and Effect

Piracy is routinely held up as a root cause for media industry problems but is in fact as much symptom as it is condition.  Piracy has flourished in its many forms because it has moulded itself most closely to changing consumer demand.    The history of 20th century media businesses can be mapped by format milestones: vinyl, VHS, the DVD, cable TV, the CD. The download and the stream were the first tentative steps towards a new wave of formats and didn’t ever get out of first gear. They are transition technologies that failed to become the holistic format milestones for their age that predecessor formats were. Previous media formats shaped and dictated revenue growth, digital heralded decline. Why? Because the download and the stream are owned by audiences as much as they are by media companies.  And media companies haven’t yet realized that because these democratized quasi-formats are fantastic consumer tools they therefore need to ensure their products do more, much more. This is no longer a dubbed-cassette-copy-versus-original-CD arms race. Consumers can create digital content every bit as good as good as that of media companies.

The harsh reality is that convenience, portability and quality are the standards which consumers already get from free and illegal digital content products.  Paid content strategy must be founded on going above and beyond these digital basics.  Premium digital products and formats must deliver rich and interactive experiences that are:

  • Dynamic – always change and update with new content
  • Interactive – empower user participation and customization
  • Social – place social functionality and connectivity at the core
  • Curated – curate discovery and editorial

Embracing Disruption

It would be puerile to suggest that the D.I.S.C. principles apply uniformly across all media types. Applicability varies and of course implementation must be tailored, but the fundamental principles have vital relevance across all major media industries. The media industries are now at a juncture where embracing disruption can save them from perpetual decline and potential annihilation. The paradigm shifts in media industry business models and consumer behaviour have been happening more quickly in the last 15 years than ever before, but these changes are still only a small part of much bigger processes that have many years yet to play out and which will come to full fruition when the Digital Natives generation come of age. D.I.S.C. strategies need pursuing now, before the condition is incurable. Media companies can identify the size of the format innovation opportunity by combining the applicability of D.I.S.C. principles to their industries with the scale of industry-wide disruption they are experiencing (see figure). But acting now rather than later will be the difference between using D.I.S.C. as a catalyst for growth as opposed to an air bag to cushion the blow of a market crash. Timing is everything.

To read the full report, which includes industry-by-industry analysis, simply subscribe to Media Industry Blog using the email form at the top right of this page.  If you are already as subscriber but haven’t yet received your free copy please email musicindustryblog AT gmail DOT COM.

Full table of contents of ‘The Media Format Bill of Rights’

  • The 20,000 Foot View
  • Setting the Scene
  • The Media Consumption Pendulum Has Swung Sharply
  • (Apparently) The Revolution Will Not Be Digitized
  • It is Time to Jump Off The Treadmill
  • Digital Does Not Need to Mean the Death of Ownership
  • The Media Format Bill Of Rights
  • Applying the Laws of Ecosystems to Media Formats
  • Building the Future of Premium Media Products
  • Applying the Media Product Bill Of Rights Across all Media Industries
  • Embracing Disruption is Risk and Dangerous But a Necessity
  • We Are In the Per-Person Age, Not the Per-Device Age
  • Conclusion

Why Apple’s Impact on Media Companies Has Only Just Got Started

There was a sense of disappointment in some quarters yesterday as Apple announced the third generation iPod, largely because it looks pretty much like a better version of the iPad2 rather than a dramatic step change.  But it was the right move for Apple.  The history of Apple’s device business in the last decade and bit has been a highly effective blend of step change, and evolution.

An Evolutionary Update for iPad3 Was The Right Move

There was no need for Apple to revolutionize the iPad now.  It is the market leading device that is still the most eagerly sought after and is continuing to leave the competition in its wake (latest figures from Forrester suggest that no single competitor has more than 5% market share).  Just as the iPhone 4S was an incremental update that left some industry observers disappointed but actually went on to perform fantastically in terms of sales, so the iPad3 delivers enhancements without breaking the winning formula.  It also enables Apple to push down prices on the iPad2, effectively turning it into the entry level device for iPad customers – a smart strategy which Apple has used to great effect with the iPhone range.

What iPad Lacks in iPod’s Scale It Makes Up for In Momentum

To date Apple has sold 55.2 million iPads (see figure), no mean feat in less than 2 full years of sales.  But to put those figures in context, Apple has sold 334.5 million iPods.  Add that to the 183 million iPhones sold and it is clear that the majority of Apple’s iDevice customers do not have iPads.  iPods and iPhones remain Apple’s most pervasive impact on media consumption and yet the iPad appears to be the one having most dramatic impact on media business models.  There are three key reasons for this:

  • iPad owners are highly valuable, leading indicator customers. iPad owners are the cream of Apple’s already tech skewed audience.  They spend the most and value content the most.  The ROI on developing for this current installed base alone is enough to justify the pivoting of many major media companies’ content strategies.  But iPad owners also give us an indication of what future consumers will want.
  • Tablets are a tailor made for media experiences. As much as media companies wanted to embrace mobile, mobile phones always had the frustrating restriction of tiny screens, forcing media companies to crush down their carefully crafted content into artificially small chunks.  Tablets on the other hand present most of the benefits of mobile with the visual capabilities of PC but with the added benefit of touch.  Thus while mobile was always a case of cutting down to optimize, tablets actually enable media companies to deliver richer user experiences than ever before.
  • iPad growth is dramatic, and some.  It took Apple 7 quarters to reach 55 million iPad sales.  It took them nearly 5 years to reach the same milestone for iPods.  Of course there are numerous mitigating factors (the increased presence of Apple is just one) but the momentum is clearly with the iPad. 

The TV is Apple’s Way of Really Getting Into the Living Room

So the case for media companies’ obsession with the iPad has no small amount of justification (though of course it should be part of a blended device and platform and device strategy that matches the behaviors and needs of the target audience, not the personal device preference of senior management).  But at risk of sowing fear, uncertainty and doubt (FUD) into the minds of content strategists, beware, Apple has got its sights on a new market: the TV.  It seems increasingly likely that Apple will launch a fully-fledged TV product later this year.  Whether they do or not, this is Apple’s next new market.  Of course Apple has patiently plodded away with Apple TV for years, a product that still – uncharacteristically for Apple – lacks identity and if TV wasn’t so important for Apple would have gone the way of the Newton long ago.

TV matters for Apple because it needs a foothold in the living room:

  • Living room technology spend is all about the TV.  Consumers used to change their Hi-Fi just because the manufacturer changed the colour, now living room tech spend is firmly focused on the TV.  Having an iPod temporarily plugged into another company’s docking station is simply not enough for Apple.  Air Port Express and Apple TV aren’t enough either.  And though Apple shows little appetite for trying to reignite the Hi-Fi space – they can leave that battle to Sonos and Google – they do know that getting into the TV corner of the room opens up a whole new market for them in the way the iPhone did.
  • New markets accelerate growth.  Opening up new markets is important for Apple.  Unlike a company like Samsung,  Apple do not play for the whole market, they play for the upper part of it – not the top, as their entry level device strategy attests – but certainly from the upper mid upwards.  This means that each of their range of devices has a theoretical ceiling and Apple’s way of sustaining market momentum is to find a new market to address before growth in the former slows. (Note that hardly an eyebrow is raised at the fact that iPod growth has been in decline since 2010).  And though some might say TV feels like an unnatural fit for Apple, I remember first joining Apple analyst briefings soon after the iPod launched.  Everyone was asking questions about server and education strategy and gave me very bemused looks when I started asking questions about music strategy!  TV  is in actual fact a much better fit for Apple 2012 than iPod was for Apple 2001.
  • TV helps establish the iPad in the living room. The iPad has many great use cases, and the living room is certainly one of them. But Apple doesn’t want it to go the way of the laptop in the living room and just become a tertiary device for multitasking when you are bored with what’s on the TV.  Instead Apple wants the iPad to become our universal remote control – in the way that the iPhone once looked like it might.  And to do that, it really needs to have a great big piece of Apple – or Apple integrated – kit where the TV currently sits.

Apple’s TV Strategy Could Kill Off Connected TVs

When Apple does finally play its TV card – and there are many, many things it could do – expect it to transform the sector in the way it did the smartphone sector with the iPhone.  Yes, a whole market of TV manufacturers are rightly concerned. Not just because of the competitive threat but because Apple’s TV strategy could well leave their Connected TV strategies stillborn.  I’ve been a technology analyst for long enough to see a few false dawns for interactive TV.  While connected TVs are much better than what has come before, they deliver much inferior browsing and interactive experiences to PCs and tablets.  And therein lies the problem: TV companies are trying to squeeze the Internet into TV, which is a doomed to failure.  Because we know that TV (i.e. video) experiences already work great on the web. The TV is already in the Internet.  The missing piece is simply taking the TV that is in the Internet and placing it in the TV set in a seamless, elegant, convenient and highly interactive way.  And we all know which company builds those principles into its product DNA.  When Apple flicks the switch on its TV strategy it will instantly remove the distinction between TV and web.

Apple has spent the last decade transforming media businesses and content experiences.  But the media companies pay heed: the journey has only just begun.

Ecosystems In The Age Of The API

Walled gardens, Ecosystems, Platforms, call them what you will, but the mechanisms through which our digital content experiences are managed have evolved much over the last 15 years.

In the early days of the web, ISPs tried to control our entire online lives by building proprietary walls around users.  These so-called Walled Gardens were exemplified by  AOL.  But as Internet users got savvy  they banged away at those walls until they crumbled under the weight of inevitability in much the same manner as the Berlin Wall did.  Mobile carriers briefly brought Walled Gardens back from the dead (and there’s still an extended death rattle in some parts), but these days we expect our Internet journeys to be broadly free.  I say ‘broadly free’ because of course many of the destinations on our digital journeys are not open, and some of them are harder to get in and out of than others.  In fact the journey of the digital consumer is analogous to that of a traveller in Medieval Europe.  The highways are sometimes wild and unpredictable, while the coveted destinations are walled cities and heavily fortified castles.

Ecosystems are the success stories of paid content

The reasons the walls exist in the digital realm are not entirely different from that of Medieval Europe’s mercantile cities.   Walls protect their inhabitants from unwanted external intrusion, but most importantly they guarantee those inhabitants a quality of existence that could not happen externally.  This is why ecosystems are the success stories of paid content.  The xBox, Kindle and iTunes ecosystems have all succeeded in converting portions of their users into paid content buyers at rates unachievable elsewhere.

Walls alone though aren’t enough

As many a newspaper will tell you, simply throwing a pay wall up around your content doesn’t magically create a loyal paying audience.  The reason that iTunes et al work is because the priority of their walls is to create and guarantee a quality and consistency of experience within them.   Protecting against external intrusion is of secondary concern.  Once you have created a high quality experience within those walls, then you can start thinking about leveraging revenue.  Just in the same way a successful Medieval city state that could guarantee prosperous trade and commerce within its walls could also demand greater taxes from its subjects than one that could not.

Take the example of xBox Live, the networked gaming component of xBox.  When the service was first launched it was a gimmicky extra.  But when, years after launch, Microsoft turned off access to Live to xBox users who had pirated games on their consoles there was a massive outcry from jilted (pirate) users who claimed that their xBox experience was useless without Live.  What Microsoft had done was use the confines of their ecosystem to create a unique experience that could not exist externally and of which users quickly realized the emotional and monetary value.

A new generation of ecosystems

But as successful as closed, device-based ecosystems are, things are changing, quickly.  We are seeing the emergence of a new breed of ecosystem that doesn’t have the straightforward mechanism of a device operating system to define its boundaries.  Instead this new generation of ecosystem almost paradoxically uses openness to create its closedness.  These ecosystems use software developer APIs to create vibrant platforms in which a quality of experiences exist.  Nobody exemplifies this approach better than Facebook with their Socially Optimized Web Strategy. 

The net result is that we now have three key types of Content Ecosystem Models co-existing (see chart).

  • Closed Door Ecosystems: these have the most impermeable walls, typically defined by the operating system of a family of devices.  Apple’s iTunes is the best of breed example.  User experiences and all externally developed experiences (typically Apps) can only exist within the ecosystem of supported devices. 
  • One Way Ecosystems: these leverage software applications to define boundaries, but unlike Closed Door Ecosystems they do not have the benefit of proprietary hardware so rely upon the quality of the experience delivered by the software.  To help achieve this, One Way Ecosystems leverage developer communities via APIs.  This enables bite sized chunks of the  ecosystem’s experience to be delivered externally, though almost always with a view to ultimately encouraging users in, or back in, to the centre. Control is exercised by ensuring that a core level of experience, and Apps, can only be experienced internally.  A contemporary example is Spotify, who already support some externalization, but last week announced the creation of an internal, closed wall API platform.  Thus Spotify aims to benefit from the external reach of the API era while simultaneously reaping the rewards of the Closed Door model.
  • Revolving Door Ecosystems: these are the true child of the API era.  Typically they exist without an OS or other proprietary software to define their boundaries.  Instead they leverage APIs to deliver a subtler but highly effective ecosystem that fully supports inward and outward flows of externally developed experiences and Apps.   What protects these ecosystems from disintegrating under this laissez-faire approach is tightly policing the flow of data, so that the ecosystem’s data and context is depended upon entirely to deliver the value of Apps and other experiences.  Facebook isn’t the only example of this approach but is simply leagues ahead of anyone else.

The value of uniqueness

The secret ingredient of success of any ecosystem is uniqueness,   a monopoly on control of uniqueness.  A uniqueness that consumers know they cannot experience anywhere else.  However uniqueness isn’t just valuable for the technology companies building ecosystems, it is a crucial commodity for media companies in the digital age.  Piracy and the wider Internet swept away media companies’ monopoly on supply, so now uniqueness is the most important tool they have left to create new senses of monetary value among audiences.  Only when uniqueness has been achieved, can other important assets such as context, convenience and curation be fully brought to bear.

It is easy to fear ecosystems (indeed there is much to give cause for concern) and there are growing issues about how competing  ecosystems will co-exist (if at all).  But they are also the key to successfully monetizing content in the digital age, and they will continue to evolve.  Devices transformed Walled Gardens into Ecosystems, and APIs have transformed Ecosystems into Platforms.  Change will inevitably continue at a bewildering pace, but  the challenge which media companies must rise to, is to become active participants in, nay, catalysts for that change, not shell-shocked observers.